What happens to a piece of meat when you heat it up?

It shrinks. Those huge hamburger patties are suddenly not so large and if you are frying bacon (or soy bacon in my case) you know that a large square of bacon continues to contract until you have a thin crispy strip.

Why does it shrink? Two major things are happening. First, the fat in the mean (or bacon strip) is melting and disappearing. The bacon feels greasy when you take it out of the pan because the fatty sections melted away. Secondly, the proteins contract. The collagen and other fibers get more tightly wound so the piece of meat gets smaller. As you cook it goes from being soft, pliable, and smaller to crispy, stiff, and very small. The contraction was so strong that the strip curls.

So, energy is good, except hard to control. We’d love to get fat melting and tissue shrinkage but not get stiff, contracted skin.
And, with Facetite, Bodytite, and Morpheus we can. The computer in the system allows us to add energy to melt fat and get contraction, but also allows very precise control of the energy in terms of both where it is going and how much is going in.

By controlling the energy so precisely we get contraction and fat melting, without the negative effects of too much energy. The machine even shuts off automatically if it senses that too much energy is about to go in.

This explains, roughly, how the technology works and also explains why it sometimes doesn’t. If your skin is very loose, very thin, or very damaged the amount of energy that can be safely administered will not be enough to achieve a meaningful improvement. You’ll still get some improvement, but in these situations redraping the skin (such as with a facelift) is the best way to go for more meaningful results.

In surgery, as with many areas of life, having power with precise control can achieve great results. Our facetite, bodytite, and Morpheus technologies give us that power and control.